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Squatters who took over Gordon Ramsay’s $16.1M London pub are ‘served papers’ — while some choose to stay inside restaurant

It’s closing time in London.

Professional squatters who took over Gordon Ramsay’s $16.1 million London pub were forced out after they were “served papers,” while part of the resistance seemingly chose to stay behind inside the restaurant.

Members of the Camden Art Cafe, a self-described “autonomous cafe in the heart of Camden,” announced they received the papers on Tuesday which ordered them to leave the celebrity chef’s York & Albany gastropub.

Professional squatters who took over Gordon Ramsay’s $16.1 million London pub were forced out after they were “served papers.” Wikipedia

“We are sad to announce Camden art collective have left the building after being served papers yesterday,” the group announced on Instagram. “We wish those left in the building the best of luck in their endeavors.”

“We hope to be a part of the community again soon.”

The group of 20-something squatters went by the pseudonym “Gordon” — referencing the iconic chef — in an attempt to protect their identity, according to the Independent.

The group claimed to have occupied the British restaurant as a form of protest for the “victims of gentrification” and the country’s high-speed railway, H2S.

“We aim to open our doors regularly to anyone and everyone, particularly the people of Camden who have been victims of gentrification and parasitic projects like HS2,” the group said in an earlier post to social media.

An alleged squatter leaves the York and Albany restaurant in Camden as her friend secures the gate with a bike lock on April 13, 2024. News Licensing / MEGA

“We provide free food, drinks, and a space to display their art without the ridiculous red-tape that galleries require people to jump over. We believe all of us and our art deserve dignity.”

HS2, England’s second high-speed rail project, is planned to connect the village of Handsacre, in Staffordshire, with London, a distance of about 130 miles.

It is under construction, with completion set between 2029 and 2033.

The group of 20-something squatters went by the pseudonym “Gordon,” according to a report. News Licensing / MEGA

The squatters were forced to cancel their cafe — allegedly set up to feed the homeless — after they were served the papers.

“Apologies to everyone who was going to come along today. Papers served cafe canceled!” the group said Tuesday morning.

The group says it chose Ramsay’s luxurious hotspot in Camden because of the wealth disparities in the London borough, wanting to open the $16 million restaurant for everyone to enjoy.

“The York and Albany is an iconic building in Camden since its opening in the 1820s; it has withstood wars and bombs, and despite what the media says, it will withstand the potentially short but hopefully long stay we squatters have here.

“At a time when Camden market has been bought out by a billionaire and many longstanding local businesses are being evicted from their units, it’s even more important that we all band together in all the forms of resistance that we know and can.”

The restaurant had been closed when the squatters took over as the “Hell’s Kitchen” host worked to sign over to new partners in a multimillion-dollar deal.

“The pub was temporarily closed while he was finalizing a new lease, and during this handover period, a gang of professional squatters somehow bypassed all the security and CCTV, and got themselves in,” a source previously told the US Sun.

The group had initially boarded themselves inside the building using appliances straight from the kitchen.

They also told the locals the restaurant was their home, according to the outlet.

Gordon Ramsay was working to sign over the spot to new partners in a multimillion-dollar deal at the time the squatters took over.

The squatters had threatened legal action against anyone who tried to force them out, saying they were entitled to remain in the pub because it is a “non-residential building.”

A 2012 law made squatting a criminal offense in England and Wales, as long as it took place inside a residential building, with the maximum penalty of six months’ imprisonment and/or a fine.

“Take notice that we occupy this property and at all times there is at least one person in occupation,” a legal notice posted outside the pub read.

The restaurant had been closed when the squatters took over as the “Hell’s Kitchen” host worked to sign over to new partners in a multimillion-dollar deal. @camdenartcafe/Instagram
The group’s statement posted to Instagram. Instagram

“That if you attempt to enter by violence or by threatening violence we will prosecute you … You may receive a sentence of up to six months imprisonment and/or a fine of up to £5,000 ($6,200).”

The police have remained away from the issue as they call it “a civil matter” that has to be dealt with in the courts.

The “Masterchef” star was embroiled in an unsuccessful legal battle to free himself from the building’s lease in 2015, putting his family members at odds.

He was ordered to pay $797,000 in rent after his father-in-law, Christopher Hutcherson, allegedly used a “ghost writer” machine to sign Ramsay’s name on a legal document.